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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back. to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus on our reports from the front lines. the family of junior seau's family is suing the nfl and helmet maker riddel, claiming his death was caused by violent hits during his career. he died of a self-inflicted gun shot wound to the chest last year and his family says the suit will send a message to the nfl to care for its former players to acknowledge what they call decades of deception on head injuries and player safety. >>> the house has passed a bill that would prevent the united states from hitting the debt ceiling. at least right away. it's dubbed the no budget no pay act. it was proposed by republicans and it lets the treasury department borrow money until mid-may, as long as congress pass
the atmosphere here. environment experts believe lawmakers are taking the situation seriously. >> there is a political ownership of that change. the government is certainly more responsive, but in terms of action, and implementation is a problem and there is a lot of slack, even now. >> whenever the experts say, it is people with breathing problems to suffer the most. this man has had asthma all his life and his condition gets worse. >> we cannot inhale that. we're not comfortable breathing that air. i usually go to the park in the morning but i don't feel like it when there is smog. >> local authorities are planning to place electric signboards to warn drivers about pollution and encourage them to keep their cars at home. activists say it's a start but what they want to see is a better public transport policy and a secure cycling lane it to encourage drivers to leave their cars at home and keep pollution and smog at bay. >> the president of venezuela remained in cuba where he has been treated for cancer. a spokesman says he's overcome a respiratory infection and is still poli
movement in this country, which is what climate is about, which is but the environment was about what led by who? tey roevel wasmbrad byen le russell train, great republicans. it was a terrific republican sense of leadership. nelson that, the rockefeller. >> richard nixon? >> clean air act. i mean, the man that took the lead out of the air. richard nixon. the man who saved the waters of this country, richard nixon. the last great liberal president this country had. i would just like to see as rise above this pattern -- petty partisan bickering that i hear in this panel. >> ts speech ld outhe thing that we have deal with. the things the government has to be involved in. the air, the water goes from state to state, city to city. one place cannot do it. it has to be the business -- the regulation of how you protect with all of that has to be the business of the federal government. >> could i get half a minute of the bottle? cap and trade worked well for acid rain. acid rain stays in our country. i am not against regulated carbon. if you can get china and india to do something. if they do no
, the impact is stronger because they're less affected by the direct environment. >> are we enter ago harder market? which is to say can insurance companies start to raise premiums across the board? >> it varies a lot by line of bit in my country, but certainly post super storm sandy there will be hardening of rates. in the uk, though, with the rates going down, even though motor has been not that profitable -- >> why is that. >> because the competition is a pretty competitive environment. >> and we had changes in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over
is what the environment was about, was led by teddy roosevelt. it was embraced by men like russell train, great republicans. it was a terrific republican sense of leadership. nelson rockefeller. >> how about richard nixon? >> richard nixon. the clean air act. the man who took the lead out of the air. richard m. nixon. the man who saved the waters of this country, richard m. nixon. the last great liberal president this country had. i just would like to see this rise above this petty, partisan bickering that i heard somewhere in this panel. >> this is all part of the speech, laid out, the thing that we at least have to do with. the things the government has to be involved in. the air, the water goes from state to state, city to city. one place cannot do it. it has to be -- the regulation of how to deal with protecting all of that has to be the business of the federal government. >> can i get half a minute of rebuttal here? cap and trade work well for acid rain. acid rain stays in our country. i am not against regulated carbon. if you can get china and india to do something. if they don't,
-book. what is your new idea for saving the environment? >> the big idea is we spent 20 years on global warming trying to make fossil fuels more expensive. that didn't work. there's an important shift that needs to be made to making clean energy safe. >> stephen: what is your idea clean coal? >> all the technologies. >> stephen: clean coax you are on board. >> if they can figure out a way to cheaply capt tiewrt coal it needs to be put on the list. >> stephen: clean cool. that takes care of all of it. you are not like a tree hugger kind of guy, right? >> i am sort of a tree hugger. >> stephen: you are? they don't hug you back. it's a one-way relationship. >> most people what they care about is, you know, things on the economy and jobs. i think we say look, we all care about the same things. we want the same things from energy, we want it to be cheap, reliable and increasingly clean. that's what we've gotten over the centuries. we've gone from wood to coal, coal to gas and renewables. it's done through technology innovations. it's something americans are good at. >> stephen: so you are on
for the presentations. i have two questions. one of the main arguments is two days ago good situation or environment for pursuing negotiation of describing 2004. i want to know in light of all the things we know of what the government has received about the taliban and the americans, why does it say that americans taliban ace would find this two days good times in early 2000 when i mentioned iran. could you please elaborate more? the other is in passing i heard something about him yet and iran. they have any role is to discuss. thank you very much. >> katie from the department of state. mr. abbas, you linked the reference, the growth of ttp to the lack of support received two bodies. i went to see if you would kindly clarify for domestic political will and pride i should put that to be provided to? >> u.s. commission on international religious freedom for professor abbas and professor gopal. the role of privilege and in the pakistani offer religious terms. does that play with the populations of taliban assigned? says something that brings people closer to them or is that political verbiage in a diff
changed. and our competitors are vying to provide more supportive environments for innovators, inventions, and started countries. there has been a seachange in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing members are educated in the united states and who we've been forced to return to the nation of origin. so even though many of the most talented young people from around the globe still pour into the united states to obtain their masters or doctoral degrees in the s.t.e.m., now more than ever, they are not just tempted to take their education home with them and start businesses elsewhere, they are attracted by their own country and forced to our outdated immigration system. what an unwise way to compete in the global economy. our outdated immigration system hasn't adapted for the modern world. half of all masters and doctoral degrees in s.t.e.m. fields at american universities are today earned by foreign-born students who then face an uncertain expensive than unwieldy path to pursuing their dreams in the united states. our country is hemorrhaging innova
are this low. perhaps he needs yields to be higher to say he was forced to do it. in this environment it's not going to happen. >> to bring you back, is there any sense at all that the full in borrowing cost for the spanish government is going to feed through into the wider economy? i spoke on friday to the economic affairs minister. he told me this is what's going to happen -- now that borrowing costs are down it will feed through to the real economy. do you think that's going to happen or not? >> i hope yes because really we need some new measures. and we need some help to keep on growing again, as i was saying before. really, the -- what's going to say prime minister to all the investors. we have problems in the banking system with banking as you tell before. we have problem with the bank, and we need to -- a solution, to solve. with the meeting this morning with the president of the euro group, mr. junker, not tell any news about how will be the new measure. we are waiting and waiting and hoping that the new measures could be really strong, could be really positive. almost -- almost
. as a keen observer of his environment, philosopher lao tzu saw how divergent aspects of nature, like mountainand water come together to form a harmony of wholeness. one of the most notable sayings attributed to him reads -- stand like mountain, flow like water. to stand like mountain means to be strong, secure and stable in your personal environment through dramatic changes. to flow like water reminds us to move with, rather than against, the flow of those things we cannot change nor have the power to control. [ bird sounds ] the advice, stand like mountain flow like water is a gentle yet very powerful reminder to seek and maintain a sense of harmony within ourselves and the environment. a harmony that unites mind, body and spirit. if you were to ask any person what they like best about nature, you might hear one word repeated often in these conversations -- solitude. a respite for the soul. retreating to a deserted beach, walking silently through a cathedral forest, or standing alone at a cascading waterfall are moments we long to experience, even cherish during
but in the globally competitive environment if you are, you can run some ads but you are not going to be altruistic. there's a bass that that philosophy and that's what we teach in the backup schools and the basic rule of privatism as to what works. here's the dilemma. lots of things work in the short term that are incredibly district in the long term. the amortization mortgages, said prime lending worked for years and there were economic disasters. it's one of the biggest problems coming you can't be rational because rationality demands a long-term perspective. you can't act on principle because pragmatism has no principles. it's not surprising we have so many ethical violations in business because people don't act on principle, and you can't be principal if you don't believe that you have principle. you have to do what works. with pragmatism it's the mentality. and we are releasing that right now in that debate that we are going on in the country to the we have massive deficits and the social security, medicare and every body knows it, and nobody really seriously wants to do anything about it. an
players have always, always relished that, always thrived in that kind of environment. >> i think if you're prepared for a situation, you're going to be confident when you go out to try to win a football game or whatever you're doing. if you're prepared for it, you're going to be confident. it's just head down, keep working. this isn't a time to relax and get out of your routine or stop working hard. this one you should be working your hardest. >> working their hardest with so many distractions around them. first parades of the mardi gras carnival kicked off this weekend. they continue throughout the week with a break on super bowl sunday. even though new orleans has hosted the super bowl several times before, this is only the second time that both events have coincided. more than a million people are expected in new orleans for these two monumental events. reporting live outside the new 49ers stadium here in santa clara, bob redell, nbc bay area news. >>> so far the team seems to be in a relaxed mood, just soaking everything up. quarterback colin kaepernick was so excited he tweeted out
innovation and entrepreneurship. each of us is committed to fostering the kind of environment that supports the private sector and which turns ideas into innovations, innovations into products, products into companies that help create good jobs. under current policy, one way we do that federally is by supporting research and development through the existing r&d tax credit. companies that invest in r&d generate new products which sparks new industries with spillover benefits for all kinds of sectors. that's why there's long been strong bipartisan support for the existing r&d tax credit. by all accounts, it's working. the r&d credit has helped tens of thousands of american companies succeed and create jobs. but there's a critical gap in the existing r&d credit. it isn't available to start-ups because they're not yet profitable. and, thus, they don't have an income tax liability against which to take a credit. in fact, more than half the r&d credit last year was taken by companies with revenue over a billion, well-established, profitable companies. there's nothing wrong with that. it's just no
damage the irish countryside. our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath, reports now from the irish republic. >> one shining light in ireland's economic gloom is green energy, especially wind, where investment is booming all across the landscape. today's deal is part of that expansion. supporters say it will save money for british consumers as it promises to be cheaper than electric generated from wind in the north sea. but to work, the plan requires hundreds of new turbines to be built all across the flat and boggy irish midland. building wind farms on bogland has already been done successfully here in on the island. but to generate the green electricity needed to power three million u.k. homes is going to require much bigger turbines than the ones you see here. in fact, it will need some of the biggest ever built in the world. campaigners say the giant wind farms will be a blot on the landscape of a country that trades on its unspoiled green image. irish ministers disagree, saying the energy deal is just a first step, and tough planning laws will protect the countryside. >> i thin
environment, you have to scratch your head and wonder what's going on. >> absolutely. it may sound ak ward to, but he's mormon, don't have sex before marriage. watch dr. drew at 9:00. he's looking into the story about the 15-year-old boy who killed his family in new mexico. that's tonight on dr. drew. >>> an the speaker of the house, john boehner, says the president's goal is to wipe out the republican party and an australian eats something unusual and it lands him in court. our financial advice is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings retirement advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. learn more with our free usaa retirement guide. call 877-242-usaa. so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely looking up. [ mal
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
these decisions have on the environment that the u.s. is in. for most of history, we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can fight, but so that we can not fight. the other. that time made that is important -- the other point that tom made is to understand what is involved in military operations. there is a piece on the web that explains exactly what it is we can do with the troops we have at the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan. it is not just about bureaucrats in d.c.. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. do you does want to talk about that and several surrounding decisions? >> we have become very accustomed to throwing around numbers of troops, and people have gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious. the effect of that is that very few americans actually understand that there is a method for figuring out how many troops are actually needed to accomplish something. when the recommendation comes from a military commander, this cannot just, as this white house seems to think, the co
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
for taking a stand. some of the relatively freer environment, they're able to create conditions for the modern is that. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. who were the people who most of those things? was a king, mathematics, and death of avarice, stokely carmichael? >> guest: all of them had different roles in the movement pier one at the ways in which i tried to explain to students is rosa parks made the cooking possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she had done what she did for refusing to give up her seat on that last, martin luther king would've simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that were talking about him today. she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had been to rise to the occasion. >> host: she also said russia was sitting on the best refusing to give up her seat, she was thinking about emmett till, the 14th of black way from chicago who went to mississippi in 1855 and because he was a better way women, was brutally murdered. to think his d
environment, you have to scratch your head and wonder what's going on. >>> still to come, the speaker of the house john boehner says the president's goal is to wipe out the republican party. and an australian eats something unusual and it lands him in court. o important to make someone happy.♪ ♪it's so important to make someone happy.♪ ♪make just one heart to heart you - you sing to♪ ♪one smile that cheers you ♪one face that lights when it nears you.♪ ♪and you will be happy too. overmany discounts to thine customers! [old english accent] safe driver, multi-car, paid in full -- a most fulsome bounty indeed, lord jamie. thou cometh and we thy saveth! what are you doing? we doth offer so many discounts, we have some to spare. oh, you have any of those homeowners discounts? here we go. thank you. he took my shield, my lady. these are troubling times in the kingdom. more discounts than we knoweth what to do with. now that's progressive. >>> now our fifth story "outfront." taking down the republican party. house speaker john boehner told a group of republicans that after l
environment, you have to scratch your head and wonder what's going on. >>> still to come, the speake of the house john boehner says the president's goal is to wipe out the republican party. and an australian eats something unusual and it lands him in court. oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. overmany discounts to thine customers! [old english accent] safe driver, multi-car, paid in full -- a most fulsome bounty indeed, lord jamie. thou cometh and we thy saveth! what are you doing? we doth offer so many discounts, we have some to spare. oh, you have any of those homeowners discounts? here we go. thank you. he took my shield, my lady. these are troubling times in the kingdom. more d
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
domestic market exclusively, it's a very, very different environment with awkward rent reviews, public sector costs are highly uncompetitive right across costs such as wages. other local authority charges on retailers in particular and those with large industrial premises within the country and we also have a domestic mortgage crisis with the banks. >> now, ryanair shares are under pressure today. you can see they're trading down by better than 2%, in fact, taking the sector down, too. ez-jet is one of the worst performers on the stoxx 600 today. ryanair is roughly flat over the past seven days, so marginally higher from where we were a week ago on the back of those comments. >>> we are going to head out to tokyo as toyota reclaims the crown from gm as the world's biggest carmaker. we'll get the latest from egypt as president morsi declares a month-long state of emergency. dozens of people have been killed over anti-government protests. we'll take a view on equities, too. the dow, as we said, is on pace for its best january since 1989. and, again, for that backdrop, blackrock is report
the environment we are seeing, the fact the we have tough earnings from apple waiting on the nasdaq which is a tech heavy composite index. we are seeing a winning day on wall street. phil flynn, the latest at the stock exchange in chicago. jeff: oil prices are rebounding from a big scare yesterday on the seaway pipeline. word that a glitch shut the pipeline down or reduced by half raised concerns that the flood in oklahoma would build back again. news today that it will be a short-term situation, they should get back to full capacity. 4,000 barrels a day by next week bringing the market back up. more oil down in the gulf of mexico is bullish. more in line with the global market to get the oil out the world, natural gas today, we have a bigger drawdown than expected, natural gas still down, a reversal on this cold weather. back to you. cheryl: we are looking at starbucks after dismal earnings reports, had come up with something to look at "after the bell" that might be decent, the real story with starbucks is stock over the past several months has gone up 20%. a lot of momentum to the upsi
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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